In this Issue

News & Events
ALR

 

To get a taste of what's in ALR34, start with our selection of free-to-view articles on the ALR34 contents page A good place to begin is From the Editors.

Much of this issue puts a spotlight on Myanmar (Burma), and we include an interview with Lucas Stewart, joint editor with Alfred Birnbaum of Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds, from which we include four stories. We also feature two stories from Korean rising star Kim Ae-ran, whose writing is the focus for our forthcoming essay competition in partnership with the Literature Translation Institiute of Korea. Finally, sample some of the issue's poetry with John Mateer and Ellen Zhangand there's more in Preview.

Subscribers can read the whole issue here on the website, through our online reader or by downloading eBooks from their accounts.  

 

 

Fiction
Letyar Tun

 

The ceiling fans whirred a slow rhythm. Mould crept into the corners of the whitewashed walls; the wide windows looked out onto the barren prison yard. Nyo Maung was marched up to a low, wooden dock flanked by two long tables. His feet scraping across the broken floor tiles echoed angrily through the colonial hall. Before the Burma Socialist Programme Party emblem sat three court martial judges – two majors and a colonel – neat and robotic in their crisp green uniforms, with pomaded hair, wire-rimmed glasses and gold stars on their shoulders. Nyo Maung knew obedience had raised them in the ranks to where they could sentence any soldier to death.

 

Non-fiction
Sandip Roy

 

I was reporting on India’s 2014 general election, the one that would bring a tough-talking man named Narendra Modi to power. Sultanpur was a dingy, noisy town with narrow streets, filled with honking motorcycles and stray cows and donkeys eating garbage. Outside the congested lanes of the town, the country roads were potholed and meandered through villages with names like Teergaon and Isouli. Men here wore white turbans and women arranged their saris to veil their faces and buffalos dozed placidly in village ponds. This was what journalists always called the 'heartland of India'. It was my first time in the heart of the heartland. Born and raised in metropolitan Kolkata, I already felt like a fish out of water here.

 

News & Events

Non-fiction

Michael Vatikiotis
Sandip Roy
Wen Yourou
Translated by
Polly Barton

Fiction

Georgie Carroll
Ae-ran Kim
Translated by
Jamie Chang
Ae-ran Kim
Translated by
Jamie Chang
Letyar Tun
Translated by
Letyar Tun
Myint Win Hlaing
Translated by
Letyar Tun
Ah Phyu Yaung Shwe
Translated by
Khin Hnit Thit Oo
Ahpor Rahmonya
Translated by
San Lin Tun
Prabda Yoon
Translated by
Mui Poopoksakul
Vrinda Baliga
Neel Mukherjee
Barrie Sherwood

Poetry

Ellen Zhang
Saleem Peeradina
Shanta Acharya
Yogesh Patel

Interviews

Photography

Sundeep Keramalu