News & Events | ALR

To get a taste of what's in ALR34, start with our selection of free-to-view articles on the ALR34 contents pageA good place to begin is From the EditorsMuch of this issue puts a spotlight on Myanmar (Burma), and we include an interview with Lucas Stewart, co-editor of Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds. We also feature Korean rising star Kim Ae-ran, the focus for our forthcoming essay competition. Finally, sample some of the issue's poetry with John Mateer and Ellen Zhangand there's more in Preview.

Non-fiction | Sandip Roy

Men here wore white turbans and women arranged their saris to veil their faces and buffalos dozed placidly in village ponds. This was what journalists always called the 'heartland of India'. It was my first time in the heart of the heartland. Born and raised in metropolitan Kolkata, I already felt like a fish out of water here.

Fiction | Letyar Tun

The name Burma Communist Party took Nyo Maung back. All things pass, but not the past. Throughout his thirty years of service in the ‘Exalted Military’, Tatmadaw, he’d been indoctrinated against the BCP, more than enough to hate them.

Interviews | ALR

Myanmar has been very much in the news throughout 2017. Lucas Stewart has been working for years in Myanmar with the British Council and with Burmese writers and translators... the aim was to reveal some of the country’s complexities of culture and identity.

Fiction | Georgie Carroll
 

The nail-marks on Manmatha’s neck matched his shirt – Ferrari Red. The girl could’ve been thirteen or fourteen. Her dark cheek had shone in the half-light. Hair silky, blouse torn, teeth sharp, white as jasmine buds.

He lit the gas ring.

Blue and orange flames consumed the pan in long tongues. The pleasure of the memory filled him up...

Fiction | Neel Mukherjee

Then he took out his wallet and tried to count the rupee and US dollar notes nestled inside; he failed. Something as fundamental to intelligence as counting was eluding him. In the peripheries of his vision he could see a small crowd gathering to look at him; discreetly, nonchalantly, they thought. The news had spread. It was then that he broke down and wept for his son....

Poetry | John Mateer
On another day in Macau the poet was nearing A-Ma Temple.
Actually, he was stopped outside a Macanese restaurant,
was contemplating the menu, wondering if he had ample
time for lunch....
Poetry | Ellen Zhang

My father recounts memories of swollen blossoms

hardening into surface, secret core, hills laced with

gold, assuring amber aroma feeding on the sun.....

News & Events | ALR

The Lesson of Liu Xiaobo - Tammy Ho

What It's Like - Theophilus Kwek

Contrast - Tammy Ho

Beating Dickheads - Miguel Syjuco

Aubade - Daljit Nagra

Hiuen Tsang - Abhay K.

Free Fall - Chiang Yomei

 

     more...

News & Events | ALR
 

LATEST - 

The Lesson of Liu Xiaobo - Tammy Ho

Appropriate My Ass! - Michael Vatikiotis

 New Lucky House - Dino Mahoney

Bullfights, Thai-style - Melody Kemp

For all our blog posts, click here.

In this Issue

 

To get a taste of what's in ALR34, start with our selection of free-to-view articles on the ALR34 contents page A good place to begin is From the Editors.

Much of this issue puts a spotlight on Myanmar (Burma), and we include an interview with Lucas Stewart, joint editor with Alfred Birnbaum of Hidden Words, Hidden Worlds, from which we include four stories. We also feature two stories from Korean rising star Kim Ae-ran, whose writing is the focus for our forthcoming essay competition in partnership with the Literature Translation Institiute of Korea. Finally, sample some of the issue's poetry with John Mateer and Ellen Zhangand there's more in Preview.

Subscribers can read the whole issue here on the website, through our online reader or by downloading eBooks from their accounts.  

 

 

 

The ceiling fans whirred a slow rhythm. Mould crept into the corners of the whitewashed walls; the wide windows looked out onto the barren prison yard. Nyo Maung was marched up to a low, wooden dock flanked by two long tables. His feet scraping across the broken floor tiles echoed angrily through the colonial hall. Before the Burma Socialist Programme Party emblem sat three court martial judges – two majors and a colonel – neat and robotic in their crisp green uniforms, with pomaded hair, wire-rimmed glasses and gold stars on their shoulders. Nyo Maung knew obedience had raised them in the ranks to where they could sentence any soldier to death.

 

 

I was reporting on India’s 2014 general election, the one that would bring a tough-talking man named Narendra Modi to power. Sultanpur was a dingy, noisy town with narrow streets, filled with honking motorcycles and stray cows and donkeys eating garbage. Outside the congested lanes of the town, the country roads were potholed and meandered through villages with names like Teergaon and Isouli. Men here wore white turbans and women arranged their saris to veil their faces and buffalos dozed placidly in village ponds. This was what journalists always called the 'heartland of India'. It was my first time in the heart of the heartland. Born and raised in metropolitan Kolkata, I already felt like a fish out of water here.

 

Media

Video | Liu Xiaobo

The Nobel laureate's love poem to his wife.

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Audio | ALR

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Reviews

IN THE AFTERMATH of the Second World War and the end of Japan’s occupation of Malaysia, Teoh Yun Ling is desperately seeking her own peace.

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